How to Be a Sourcing Superhero by @WillRecruits

Closeup of a businessman showing the superhero suit under his shirtMy son is 3 years old. He loves Superheroes. He loves Batman, Ironman, & Spiderman, but his favorite show is Superman. I have to tell you, I really enjoy watching the old Christopher Reeve films. There isn’t too much violence and it is just fun to watch.

Superman is obviously affected by kryptonite, but his other Achilles heel is that he cares. He cares for people. His beliefe is that every person matters.

Think about it. As a sourcer, are you mindful and cognizant of everyone you come in contact with? It can be your Achilles heel if you DON’T care.

Sourcers are some of the most well connected people in the world. If we have chosen sourcing as our profession, then we touch a number of people’s lives. Not everyone we come in contact with is a fit for our jobs. That is okay. It is how we respond to the individuals that will define us. It will define who we are as human beings and it will ultimately be the litmus test for our success.

How many people do you contact on a daily basis either by phone, e-mail, or social media? More than you really care to admit. How many people do you dismiss because they aren’t a fit? Do you contact them to let them know that you aren’t moving forward with their candidacy? Do you make them feel like they are the only people on the planet that matter?

If you answered “no” to the above questions, you are doing an injustice to the profession. You are part of the reason the recruiting industry has a bad name.

You see, you can be Superman in recruiting. You can be the person that people look up to on a daily basis. You ARE affecting lives. You are helping them become better people. You are giving people raises and allowing them to have a better life for their families.

People matter.

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We live in one big interconnected web. We affect one life at a time. The minute you have figured this out you have figured out “Sourcery” and the sky is the limit in your recruiting career.

Wouldn’t you agree?